Hyacinths - To Feed My Soul


Spring border - 2012
As the winter draws on my mind shuts down and no new ideas for blog posts come to mind.  Does anyone else go through 'bloggers block'.  I have been reading gardening books and old magazines looking for inspiration - but nothing seems to spark enough for me to say 'yes' I'll do a post about that. But I did see some lovely hyacinth photos on Jennifer's blog which prompted me to write this post.


I thought about the hyacinths that I have in pots around the house.  I have been photographing them over the last few days as they have sent up their flower spikes and given off their heavenly fragrance.  I plant them with the intention of them blooming on Christmas day - that is my aim - but I have only ever achieved this once.  Most years, almost, but not quite.  This year was no exception.


After they have finished flowering they are demoted to the greenhouse to dry out, then they are planted out in the garden border specially reserved for hyacinth and spring flowers. I now have quite a collection that re-appear every year and flower to their hearts content, with smaller flowers than the originals, and will hopefully continue to re-appear for many years to come.


The best thing about planting them out is when you are weeding in amongst them - practically keeling over with the headiness of their scent.  This year they were particularly good value for money as I got them at half price. There is nothing quite like having a flower bloom under your fingers in the middle of winter.


The name originates from Greek mythology
Hyacinth was a beautiful youth loved by both the god Apollo and the West Wind, Zephyr. Apollo and Hyacinth took turns at throwing the discus. Hyacinth ran to catch it to impress Apollo, but he was struck by the discus as it fell to the ground, and died. A twist in the tale makes the wind god Zephyrus responsible for the death of Hyacinth. The youth's beauty caused a feud between Zephyrus and Apollo. Jealous that Hyacinth preferred the radiant archery god Apollo, Zephyrus blew Apollo's discus off course, so as to injure and kill Hyacinth. Apollo did not allow Hades to claim Hyacinth. Instead, Apollo made a flower, the hyacinth, from Hyacinth's spilled blood.


If of thy mortal goods thou art bereft,
And from thy slender store two loaves alone to thee are left,
Sell one, and with the dole
Buy hyacinths to feed thy soul.

Persian poet - Moshlin Eddin Saad


In the language of flowers
Blue Hyacinth - Constancy
Purple Hyacinth - Please forgive me
White Hyacinth - Beauty

Comments

  1. Dear elaine..
    You have written a most poetic lovely post today.
    I learnt something about these beautiful flowers and how they came to get their name.
    Yours are blooming so well. I didnt buy any for this year.
    Your spring border is just divine.
    Yes. I am pleased to read that you have bloggers block. Maybe a lot of us have it too.. I indeed have had it.
    enjoy your weekend.
    val

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I only hope the border looks as good this year.

      Delete
  2. Lovely shots, too - and you've reminded me that I must go out to the greenhouse and see how my hyacinth pots are getting on. Could be time to bring them inside...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have other bulbs in pots in the greenhouse that are only making very slow progress - too many to bring indoors though.

      Delete
  3. Well, I must say that for suffering from blogger's block, you have recovered quite nicely. I love hyacinths. I don't have nearly enough growing here, nor was I aware of the myth behind the name. I love the story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sometimes when I sit down to do a post it's like squeezing blood from a stone - I have to be in the right frame of mind.

      Delete
  4. When I first opened this post I nearly had a heart attack, I actually thought that first pic was how your garden looks at the moment...I was screaming at the screen...NO LEAVES????

    Yes, the beloved hyacinth, where would we be in winter without it.
    A lovely post.
    Sadly I couldn't comment on Jennifers post as she has no open url. xxxxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry, I didn't mean to scare you - the border looks nothing like that at the moment.

      Delete
  5. I've just come across your lovely pictures of hyacinths. I have some growing by my front door and their scent is wonderful. I look forward to them coming out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have just been over to your blog and would have become a Follower but there is no Followers gadget.

      Delete
  6. Oh how pretty and I imagine they smell so wonderful. Just what we need for these gray days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They have certainly cheered the place up and you are right they do smell lovely.

      Delete
  7. Do understand the bloggers block! After two years, I took a mini-break at Christmas. Events went downhill after that, just when I thought I was taking a break for bliss! ha! Just keep pushing forward, I guess. ANd thank goodness you have, because this is a refreshing post on hyacinths - I can almost smell them...and the scent can stir the soul!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I worry that if I take a break for too long I won't be able to get back into the swing of it - but sometimes if just feels very time consuming.

      Delete
  8. Yes, I thought that first photo was your garden right now and had a panic attack! I'm afraid I'm not a great fan of hyacinths but hey, gardens would be pretty dull if we all liked the same thing, eh? Dave

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How can you not like hyacinths - oh well it takes all sorts.

      Delete
  9. I also thought that was your garden in its New Year all and all.

    Your hyacinths in the pots put on quite a show. Thank you for mentioning that you then plant them in your garden, as I had been told that forced bulbs would not bloom again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it is a bit of a myth that they won't flower again, they always do well for me when I plant them outdoors after they have been forced -

      Delete
    2. I would like to read your blog but there isn't a link on your profile.

      Delete
  10. If that first photo didn`t give you inspiration it certainly did me, made my little piece of Sussex look quite sickly

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It just made me realise what a mess my garden is at the moment.

      Delete
  11. I can understand the writer’s block, I have reduced the writing to once or twice a week, although sometimes I have way too many photos from my garden for only 1 or 2 posts per week!

    I love hyacinths, your photos are lovely :-) I have 4 hyacinths in my garden just emerging right now, I can see their noses out of the ground with the flower buds already visible. That's pretty early, even for London.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't checked the outdoor ones yet - thanks for reminding me.

      Delete
  12. It's a shame they don't come back the same as when you first force them. But to be in and amongst that heady fragrance must be something! Glad you have broken through the blogger's block.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do find subjects to write about particularly difficult in winter.

      Delete
  13. Yes I often get blogger's block!
    A most enjoyable post about hyacinths, which I've tried growing for Christmas a couple of times without success. Flighty xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe we'll get the timing right next year.

      Delete
  14. Lovely photos, your spring border looks great!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hoping for the same this year, but at the moment, it doesn't look good.

      Delete
  15. Glad I am not the only one to fail to get them blooming on Christmas Day! I have to admit that I can only have them in the hall, in a smaller, enclosed space I find the scent too much. I wasn't going to bother again, since I didn't think they would grow well outdoors afterwards, but you have convinced me otherwise, so thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  16. A writer's block? I think you wrote a lovely poetic ode to th hyacinths. What should a winter be without these scented flowers in the home. Mine are not yet so far, I think within a week or two we get the first flowers out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have crocus, snowdrops and iris waiting in the greenhouse, but they are getting on very slowly.

      Delete
  17. Once these are out blooming here, I should buy a few to cheer up the kitchen. I've never forced them before but wonder how well they'd do on a window sill. I like to write and don't often get bloggers block. But I do have to dig deeper for something to write about in winter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Once they have had a period in the dark in cold conditions they do just fine when you bring them indoors.

      Delete
  18. Hi Elaine, I am so touched that my blog post inspired you! Yes, I sometimes get blogger's writing block. I think of ideas for posts and end up dismissing them all! December was hard for me this year. I felt tired out and discouraged for some reason.
    Spring bulbs keep me going in winter. I have pots of tiny daffodils by my art table. They are so cheery! Not everyone likes the spicy fragrance of hyacinths, but I happen to love them. Your spring border looked lovely in 2012. Hopefully, spring is not far away.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your posts are always inspiring Jennifer! I have lots of other pots of bulbs crocus, snowdrops etc. but they are nowhere near ready yet, they certainly cheer the place up whilst waiting for the outdoor bulbs to come through.

      Delete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

the rise of the apple and the fall of the oak ...

Down to Earth ...

the sweet calm sunshine of September ...