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Friday Flowers . What's New in Bloom . Pretty Cows and Handsome Horses

The poor old garden has really taken a bashing this week.  Rain, hail, even a bit of snow and gale force winds.  Welcome to spring in England.  I ventured out inbetween heavy bouts of rain to pick the Friday posy - there wasn't a lot to choose from but I managed to make a fairly decent bouquet.
lilac, tulips, pansies, aquilegia and cornflowers
The garden is at that awkward stage changing over from bulbs to cottage garden flowers that aren't quite in full throttle yet.

Spanish bluebells
In the front garden the bluebells have now emerged amongst the forget-me-nots.  Each year I dig bucketfuls of bulbs out but they just seem to come back stronger than ever.  I didn't plant these, they were in the border long before we got here and have established themselves good and proper.  They don't last long in flower and the leaves look a mess when they have gone over - I am quite brutal with them but they don't seem to mind.
aquilegia
The Aquilegia are just starting to open - it is hard to get a decent photo of them when their heads droop these are the more natural smaller headed ones, the hybrids still haven't opened yet.  I used to have a lot of almost black ones granny's bonnets we used to call them, it is just a waiting game to see which colours emerge eventually.
Allium - Purple Sensation
The Alliums are slowly opening too - I don't seem to have as many as last year, not sure where they have disappeared to - I love to see them dotted about the borders adding height above the rest of the flowers - one plant I definitely can't get enough of.
cherry blossom carpet
The wind and rain have done a great job in helping to get rid of the cherry blossom the lawn is covered  and it sticks to the soles of your shoes and you carry it indoors and leave petals all over the door mat - I seem to be forever sweeping it all up.
Geranium
And finally the Geraniums are starting to flower.  At least these come back every year without any fuss - my sort of plant.



Each year during the summer months we rent the field out for grazing for horses.  There are four in there at the moment and they are intrigued by my comings and goings.


Peering over the fence whilst I am working in the kitchen garden


Friendly chaps who provide plenty of manure I collect trugs full of the stuff when they have gone - every little helps.


Last year I planted wild flowers along the edge of the plot and they have come back really strong  this year.

And finally, at home in the back field the farmer has a couple of Guernsey cows amongst all the Friesians - they are so tiny compared to them,  really dainty with such pretty faces.

How is your garden faring with this awful weather? It can't get any worse - can it?  

Comments

  1. Your flowers look wonderful in spite of the weather you are having. Steady rain here today but it is autumn.

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    1. It's the best time of year for my garden, which is doing its best despite the awful weather - there is always something to look forward to wondering what is going to flower next.

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  2. The flowers are beautiful. I love the blend of purple, lilac and blue in your bouquet. I love your friendly companions, too, watching you over the fence. And I do like the Guernseys, it's good to see a change from Friesians/Holsteins in the fields.

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    1. Sadly the tulips are just about on their last legs now so I doubt if I will be featuring any more in my posies, but they were lovely whilst they lasted. It's great having the cows in the back field, this afternoon I was working at the top of the garden and heard the noise of water - I thought I had left the water butt tap open - but no, it was a cow on the other side of the fence having a pee. I thought it was never going to stop. lol.

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  3. Wonderful flowers..still I spent most of the time looking at the horses they are so beautiful animals ♥ love them ♥

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    1. I'm not a particular horse fancier but these are real gentlemen very calm and friendly.

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  4. Oh my goodness, it couldn't get worse, could it? Let's not tempt fate! My poor dahlia tubers, one week in the ground, could rot away in this cold non-stop rain. Only 42 degrees this morning! This is a holiday week end for us, but not much to get excited about!For once, our timetable is in sync...cherry blossoms coming in on my feet! Lily of the valley merging with the pink bells...I have pink lily of the valley which is slightly hideous unless planted with something else pink!

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    1. I haven't dared to plant out my dahlias yet it has been far too cold. The lily of the valley I planted last year have disappeared like quite a lot of other plants over the winter. I'm getting a bit fed up of having to replace everything. Never heard of pink ones though - not sure whether I would like them or not.

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  5. The colours in your posy are beautiful Elaine. A lovely day today, hopefully for you too, am now exhausted having tried to do far too much before the next lot of rain. Although, from the garden's point of view, we do need more rain already..
    Spanish bluebells have run riot here. I've tried digging them up, but the bulbs pull themselves down deep. Most of the time I only end up snapping off the leaves and they still manage to return. I'd intended to replace them with the English natives, but it will take a while methinks!

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    1. It was fabulous today and I was out in the garden practically from sunrise to sunset and got so much done I feel I am finally beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel. I am just the same with the bluebells they really do go deep down to avoid being dug up!

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  6. Awwwww....how lovely to have the horses and share the view of those gorgeous cows.....and even better that you don't have to do all the hard work re looking after them.

    I cannot BELIEVE you've had SNOW!!!! Speechless I am!

    We've had some dismal wind and feezing temps too but a glorious day today.

    I love your post and the cherry blossom, and nice to see what's blooming. Sending some good weather your way!xxxx

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    1. Thanks Snowbird - the good weather reached us and it was glorious all day. I have been planting out veg all day today and covered everything with fleece and plastic sheets just in case it turns nasty again.

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  7. Mmmm, those bluebells are so sweet looking. I've just planted a similar geranium (maderense, isn't it?) so mine haven't started blooming yet. Love that flower carpet!

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    1. I have no idea what the geranium is called but I love the colour and it flowers for ages and pops up all over so it is a good self-seeder.

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  8. Please don't mention the weather!
    Grrrrrr....

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    1. This weekend has been lovely Jane - so don't blame me when it all goes pear-shaped over the bank holiday - it's been nice to feel a bit of warmth for a change.

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  9. This is what I call a rural gardening post what with cows and horses. It's a shame that the blossom is so short lived isn't it.
    Terrific photos, especially the alliums. Flighty xx

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    1. I wish I had time to do more of the rural stuff but I can't seem to get out of the garden at the moment there is still so much to do.

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  10. It is sad when the lovely blossom falls. Our aquilegias are in flower now - not named varieties just ones that I have raised from seed. It is a sort of stop gap time but an interesting one waiting for flowers to open.

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    1. Yes I quite agree Sue - my aquilegias are finally opening too - they seem a lot taller than normal this year - the rain we had obviously did some good.

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  11. I do wish my local farmer would get a horse or two (to keep me company at work). She wasn't keen when I suggested it - I shall persevere. D

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    1. I can understand her reluctance after all she would be the one having to look after them and they don't half leave a lot of horse muck in the field.

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  12. I do wish my local farmer would get a horse or two (to keep me company at work). She wasn't keen when I suggested it - I shall persevere. D

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  13. Sunday night as I peruse the blogs I follow and the rain is hammering down. Will it ever improve? Doubtful...

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    1. It has been pouring here for three days now - hopefully the weather looks set to improve this weekend - although how long it will last is another matter.

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  14. Gorgeous photos. Your jars work certainly pays off. I do like your neighbors.

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  15. Lovely bouquet Elaine. My garden almost seems to have caught up to yours: the tulips are just about done and the geraniums and alliums have taken over. On the weekend, I saw alliums massed together and it was stunning. I think I might try that next year.I would also like to add something besides alliums to get me through that awkward stage you speak of. The Spanish bluebells look like a nice option.The dogs watch me in the garden rather like the horses must watch you.

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    1. A little while ago I was bemoaning the fact that I had lots of space to fill but mother nature has seen to it and now I'm wondering where I'm going to find space for all the plants that I have grown - oh dear.

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