I used to be a townie, but now …

In the autumn of my life I am strictly a country lady.  Many years ago now  I worked in the centre of town and was used to the traffic, the noise, the people – lots of people.  It was a way of life that I enjoyed and I never considered living any other way. 

entering the village

Then I met a man who took me away from all  that I knew, he  lived in a village twelve miles away from the town – at first I took three different buses to get to my work as I didn’t drive at the time – this was fine – I loved my job as a project manager for a display and design company and wanted to keep it.  Eventually though, the travelling got me down and I decided on another course for my life.  Living in the country was just so different from anything else I had experienced so far.  But I got used to it and began to love it.

SDC10680

Now - we come to the point of this story.  I had used the small dental practice in the village ever since I moved there and was quite happy to go even though I moved to a different village eventually.  It was convenient, just a couple of miles away - my dentist was gentle and caring – and even though it changed from NHS to a private practice – I stayed with them.

mowsley's leafy lanes

Then catastrophe – the practice closed – and after thirty odd years I had to find a new dentist.  But all was not lost – we found out where the dentist had moved to and joined the new practice.  The trouble is the new practice is back where I started, right in the centre of town.

a tree lined mowsley street

I used to know the area like the back of my hand – all the street names were familiar, but a lot of the shops had changed or closed down – and even though I hadn’t been anywhere near town for several years – it had a feeling of ‘home’ about it.  This feeling was not to last.

wild flowers and grazing cows

The sound of the traffic was the first thing I noticed – you couldn’t hear yourself speak – and the noise actually hurt my ears.  The practice is in a nice  part of town opposite a big park – so not too bad – in fact quite pretty really.  But there were people everywhere, walking dogs, jogging, people going shopping, off to their work, people of all different colours and nationalities – it all came as a bit of a shock to the system actually.

dandelion-filled roadside verge

An hour or so later we were back home – and as we drove down the leafy lanes to the village and saw once again the familiar signposts and hedgerows full of blossom -  the tension seemed to leave my shoulders, my fists relaxed and I stopped holding my breath.  I can’t remember being so relieved to be home – no cars, no people, no noise – just the sparrows squabbling in the trees and the distant sound of the lowing of the cows.

churchyard lime trees just leafing up

Of course, the country life doesn’t suit everyone, and it certainly isn’t as convenient as living in a town.  We have no bus service, no street lighting, no gas, no shops or school nearby,  no entertainment like theatres or cinema – it is certainly a quiet life.  But, as with everything, you get used to it and adapt. 

So, yes I am definitely a country lady now – town mouse turned country mouse – and there is definitely no going back, except for dental appointments of course -  but when I become too old and infirm and unable to drive a move back to a town might be inevitable – but let’s not worry about that yet a while. 


red tulips make a cheery welcome

newly planted border

clematis - montana

‘Til next time – happy gardening – and enjoy the rest of the week.

Comments

  1. The sights in town and in the country are stunning! Though the country appeals to me more than the city hustle and bustle! Such beauty everywhere around you....I can understand how the stress just leaves you when entering that beautiful scenery! Where I live it was once country and over time it evolved into the city it is today outside of Chicago. Loved the days of gravel roads and walking to the end of our street to feed the cows! Happy week to you friend!!! Nicole xo

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    1. When I was young, free and single I loved the shops, the nightlife etc. but the only nightlife I get now is in bed with a good book.

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  2. I'm always torn between city and country but as I get older I think I am more fond of the country with its quiet, where you can actually see the stars at night. The city can be a struggle and yes, it is eternally noisy. Beautiful photos Elaine.

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    1. Although I sometimes feel isolated out here - I think you can still feel that in a big city.

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  3. I love living in the country, although I what I consider to be the best of both worlds as I have a small market town a short walk along the river in one direction and pure country fields a short walk in the opposite one.
    Your clematis is looking fabulous :-)

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    1. That sounds an ideal solution Su.

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  4. I've often thought I would like to live in the country as I don't really like towns. Fortunately where I live isn't in the middle of a town. When we go on holiday whether in the UK or France we choose cottages in out of the way locations. My last job was based in a large country house in a rural village and it was such a lovely drive to work once I was off the motorway. I did travel in and out of built up areas in the course of my work though. I was lucky as soon after I left work they moved bases to a built up area which I would have hated.

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    1. My worst nightmare would have been to work in an industrial estate - such soulless places.

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  5. I've always lived in a town or busy place but long to move somewhere like a pretty, quiet village.Who knows, we may get to do that when we decide to downsize. I hope so. It looks beautiful where you are.

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    1. I have lived in all sorts of places - new housing estates, bang in the centre of a city, out in the sticks but here is where my spiritual heart lies now.

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  6. I could have written that......I was born and raised in London and spent most of my married life living in a town. It was ok......

    We moved to the country around 13 years ago now and I could not go back to living in a town. Like you I travel to the town for dental treatment but can't wait to get back to the quiet of the country lanes.

    Your garden looks so pretty. Beautiful clematis.....looks so healthy.

    Have a good evening................

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    1. Thanks Cheryl - the garden comes into its own at this time of year. I think I have just grown out of living in towns and cities now - everywhere so built up - it's as though everything is crowding in when I am so used to open spaces.

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  7. Having live in both town and country I do prefer the country way of life. I have lived in the town since I married nearly 30 years ago, but we do live on the edge of it and can be in fields within 5 minutes. Sarah x

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    1. The best of both worlds and by the sea to boot - perfect.

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  8. Hello Elaine:

    For us it is the complete opposite. We have exchanged, after twenty-five years in the heart of the Herefordshire countryside, the rural idyll for the bustle [and at times noise] of Brighton and Budapest. Of course there are aspects of the countryside we miss, but we do love all the cultural aspects of town and city life.

    Your image of Clematis montana is lovely.

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    1. You seem to have adapted well to your change of lifestyle I can't imagine you both as country bumpkins!

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  9. I always lived in the country but my work was in town and I loved it. Now I do not work anymore and when I go to town for shopping or so, I always long to go back home within a couple of hours.

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    1. I feel just the same way Janneke.

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  10. I used to love living in, not just town, but cities. It was only when we got fed up of the car alarms going off all the time, the students on shopping trolleys having drunken races at 3am, the petty vandalism, that we moved out of the city and I got my first garden. I've never looked back, and would hate to live in a city again now, too much noise, to many people. I live at the quiet end of a quiet village, with the added benefit of being right by the sea. I find it odd and a little disturbing on the rare occasions I venture into busier places. I am lucky in that our village has a doctor's surgery, a dentist, a pharmacy, butchers, veg shop. Add in home delivery and internet shopping and when I am not well enough to drive it doesn't matter. Of course the ambulance service is a tad on the slow side, the local hospital over worked and under staffed, but we have every intention of staying here until we are carried out in a box!

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    1. If only we had a few of your conveniences as it is we have to drive everywhere - a drawback I am prepared to put up with for living in such a lovely place.

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  11. I can see the attractions of living in a town, but for me the reality just doesn't work. I need the peace and quiet and wide open spaces of country life.

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  12. I have done the exact opposite, and not by choice....I miss the country so bad sometimes. The hardest thing for me to get used to was all the close neighbors and the first thing I did was put up a privacy fence. I envy the beauty that surrounds you :)

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    1. Thanks Kristen - I know what you mean about privacy and close neighbours - luckily we have open fields behind us and are not overlooked by other houses providing a view which I cherish.

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  13. I only feel like me, when I'm out in the countryside. Even my weekly visit to the supermarket is planned so that it takes a minimum of time in the 'company' of others. When I'm sitting in my veg' patch, watching the world go by..... I'm the happiest man on earth.

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    1. I miss my old veg plot for that very reason.

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  14. I completely agree. I was born and brought up in Sheffield, a busy, bustling city and I have to admit, it's nice to go back for a visit as my mum and one of my daughters still live there. I do love the shops and the variety but it's a huge relief as I drive back down to Cornwall and the traffic dwindles down to almost nothing and I finally drive down the lane to my house. like you I don't have buses or street lights or gas and I don't even have mains water or sewage. I have a well and a treatment system in my loft and a septic tank at the end my drive but I wouldn't have it any other way.

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    1. All my family are from Sheffield too, not many left now though - when my Dad took a job in Bedford he was the first to ever leave. So glad he did as we have lived in some lovely places since. Goodness you really are rural.

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  15. My lovely in-laws live in a very small village. There`s only 6 shops and a pub. I love going there to visit and my dream is to one day live there. Have to wait until my kids leave home, though. In the mean time, I`m making lots of great memories every time I go to visit. By the way your garden is beautiful! :) Hugs Debbie

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    1. Sounds a lovely place Debbie we only have a pub and a church and I'm afraid I don't go in either.

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  16. I suppose we are country mice, living on 5 acres just a block from downtown, which has only two stop lights. It is small town with about 1500 citizens; however new homes are popping up rapidly. The traffic through town is awful as the gas and oil industry takes a foothold on the Colorqdo prairie. Our small towns on one hand are dying out as huge corporation stores push small businesses out of business, but growing as families seek the small town life. Your photos are sound proof that country loving trumps city life.

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    1. Since we moved here there have been a lot of new houses built - at one time we knew everyone in the village - now I see people dog walking and wonder who they are.

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  17. A most enjoyable post, and lovely photos.
    I have always lived in suburbia with noise from people, road traffic, trains and planes but would much prefer the quiet of the countryside. I avoid towns as much as possible.
    I consider you're lucky to live where you do. Flighty xx

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  18. I can certainly relate to your words ~ your home and gardens look inviting and peaceful.

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  19. This is such an interesting thing to think about, Elaine. I'm the same as you, I'm happier in the countryside. I grew up there but then lived in London in my twenties. Now I visit London and feel overwhelmed by it. I've completely lost the ease I used to feel in a city and can't wait to get back to open spaces and the sounds of the countryside.

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    1. I never go into the city any more - our little market town is just enough for me to cope with.

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  20. I live in the suburbs, which is a nice compromise between town and country. But our burb is busy with too many speeding cars packed on the roads and plenty of noise. I think I would adapt well to your village life, although I'd probably pop into town quite a bit. Your garden photos are beautiful. :o) What is the name of the clematis in the last photo?

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    1. Thanks Tammy - the clematis is only a common Montana but it looks spectacular at the moment.

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  21. Awww thanks Elaine for your sweet comment! The red roses are my favorite too! Specially since they were a present from my hubby! :)
    Have a lovely day! :)

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  22. This resonates with me because I am a country/rural person at heart. I love the peacefulness, the quietness, and the nature. It's good for the soul and it's so tranquil!

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    1. You are so right - good for the soul I couldn't have put it better myself

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  23. Where you live is amazing....and your garden--wow!! I would be happy to never leave!! Although, the village looks quite wonderful.

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    1. Thank you Erin - I know how lucky I am I appreciate it every day.

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  24. what lovely words to begin the blog I usually comment on the photos but not this time Elaine, your dream had me wanting more ah perhaps it`s the romantic in me

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    1. Thanks for your comment David unfortunately it is on the wrong post but thanks anyway.

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  25. In Wind in the Willows, Ratty and Mole had a pretty nice life in their little backwater.Like you, I love my own quiet little spot. Life is full of simple pleasures and I savour each one.

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    1. Oh now you've got me wanting to read Wind in the Willows again - now where's my copy?

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  26. I did enjoy this and can completely relate to it, I enjoy occasional visits to cities but can't wait to see the trees and like you my shoulders only go down when the greenery begins to appear. Your part of the world sounds like a wonderful haven to me. A interesting post one I enjoyed very much.xxx

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    1. Thanks Snowbird - it is a pleasure to return home even after a couple of hours away.

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