Where the Wild Things Grow … The World Beyond the Garden Gate …

I have a passion for wild flora.  Since moving to the country over thirty years ago my passion has swelled and grown. 
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My love for my garden is well documented but my heart lies in the wild where Mother Nature scatters seed where she will and puts on spectacular shows for us to gaze upon with open-mouthed wonder.
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The last few weeks have been spent working tirelessly at home doing all the things that a dedicated gardener has to do at this time of year – but sometimes a break is needed  to appreciate the other things in life, the world beyond the garden gate.
 
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And so we went in search of where the wild things grow – secret places of tangled tunnels and verdant growth.  We were not disappointed.  For May is the time of abundance in the plant world.  Hawthorn blossom and Cow Parsley, Campion and Buttercup and where newly budded pine cones light up the trees like a thousand Christmas candles.
 
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On our walk we were accompanied by the song of the Skylark rising high in the overcast sky becoming faint and distant as it soared higher and higher.  Birdsong surrounded us as we stood in the thickets breathing in the scent of may blossom and pine – the earthy smell of the undergrowth after morning rain.
 
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Sometimes we forget to notice the ordinary – the plants that have been provided for free – the frothing filigree of Queen Anne’s Lace that grace the roadside verges is surely a sight for sore eyes but is taken for granted; plants that we call weeds in the garden suddenly take on more significance when out in the wild.  The untamed jungle that is Nature at its best.  We found that today, and came home to the ordered planting of the garden, with a renewed sense of belonging to these wild places that give us such pleasure.
 
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Home Sweet Home.

Comments

  1. Mother Nature always does a better job than our ordered gardens. She seems to know just how to blend everything together. And it seems that as gardeners we tend to fight with her. I loved your photos and the one of your house with the one orange poppy is against the white house with the rain wet walk way is a classic. I'd hand it on my wall. We have sun today, finally after 10 days more of rain. Let the gardening begin. Enjoy your week, Elaine.

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    1. All we can do is try to emulate her but the end result is never quite the same. I'm glad you enjoyed the photos - there is still only one poppy out so far but there are loads of buds waiting in the wings. We have had lots of overcast days - today is one of them and then it will return back to strong winds and rain tomorrow - oh dear - not a lot we can do about it is there.

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  2. May is such a fabulous month Elaine even when it's been cooler and wetter than normal. I enjoyed your post and fine photos. We enjoyed a similar walk in Cumbria earlier this week where the bluebells, wild garlic, stitchwort and wood sorrel were in the prime with many other wildflowers waiting in the wings.

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    1. May and June are my favourite months in the garden - then it seems to go into a sulk until September. Seeing flowers in the wild is a constant joy and I am often found stopping the car to take photos of the roadside verges where they seem to proliferate.

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  3. I'd love the space to have my own wild flower meadow. We visited a garden that I will post about later th where the gardener had created a beautiful one.

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    1. Me too - sadly the garden just isn't big enough - we can but dream eh!

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  4. Lovely post and pictures. There is so much to enjoying looking at outside of our gardens and plots. Flighty. xx

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    1. I agree - even the lowly dandelion looks a treat - so why do I dig them out when I see them lurking in the flower borders!

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  5. Nature is definitely at her best this month, all around us. The Devon banks are full of wild flowers at the moment. Pink, blue, white and yellow.

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    1. A sight for sore eyes that's for sure.

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  6. Dear Elaine - the countryside has really excelled herself this month. I am just loving all the buttercups turning the meadows golden and the cow parsley in drifts along the lanes. Your photos are lovely - a delight to see.

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    1. Thanks Rosemary - I saw a field today with horses grazing amongst a whole host of buttercups - what a sight - unfortunately no camera to hand - isn't that always the way.

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  7. I love the wild flowers, May is such a wonderful month everything is fresh, green and lush.
    Have a nice week Elaine!

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    1. You are right - everything is so lush and green at the moment - almost overwhelming.

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  8. superbalicious there you are Elaine a new word for your post, PS are you still using the Nikon D3200?

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    1. I like the new word David - perfect. Yes we are getting used to the Nikon with lots of experimentation from husband - we will never be in the same area of perfection as you though.

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  9. A lovely reminder that ,lovely as our gardens are, nature is spectacular ! Love your macro shots ! :-)

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    1. Thanks Jane - nature certainly knows how to put on a show - that's for sure.

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  10. I entirely agree with your views on Nature. I had a similar walk last week along a headland, surrounded by the sea and whipped by the winds, yet supporting a beautiful patchwork of flora - thousands of bluebells, bright golden gorse, drifts of moonflower daisies, red campion and I took so many photos it was hard to decide which ones to post on my blog - I just wanted everyone to see all this Cornish beauty. The holidaymakers who are here at the moment have picked the very best time for coming to Cornwall, the month of May is The Best! I only hope everyone looks behind the touristy hot-spots, the tat shops and the commercialism to find the real, wild places.

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    1. You can't beat nature in the wild - Cornwall sounds lovely at this time of year - you are so lucky to be surrounded with such beauty.

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  11. Home sweet home is gorgeous!!! Look at all of that luscious foliage, blooms and green!!!! You are so blessed to have not only your garden but the countryside to get lost in all around you! You are so right those buds so look like Christmas candles!!! The blooms that adorn your walk are amazing! I could get lost there! And yes...I am with you about the wild spreading and doing what it will.....I always shriek with joy when I find a new plant that has turned up in the garden from a seed that was carried by the wind! It feels like the most amazing gift! Happy new week to you friend! Beautiful photos! Nicole xoxo

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    1. Thank you Nicole for your lovely comment. I do so appreciate where we live and the beauty that surrounds me.

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  12. We all know the story of the vicar leaning over the fence and saying to the gardener "Aren't god's works wonderful". And the gardener replies "Yes, but it was a bit of a mess when he was looking after it by himself".

    Personally, I'm like you; I love to see it all in its natural form. Most of our early May flourish has now gone, but we still have the orchids to come. Lovely time of year.

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    1. You have to take the good with the bad in nature - nettles and all.

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  13. Beautiful words and pictures. So much green...
    I especially like your pink campions - and the song of the skylark.
    I've only recently started calling cow parsley Queen Anne's lace - it sounds far more romantic!
    All the best :)

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    1. There are campions everywhere at the moment - I have some in the garden and hope that they will spread them selves around - they are a joy. And yes, Queen Anne's lace is a definite improvement on cow parsley.

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  14. The song of the sky lark is one of life's greatest pleasure, for me. I often stand in the garden and look up to see a tiny dot in the sky...............my summer will be less if the sky lark disappears.

    I have many wildflowers in the garden.....red campion, self heal, buttercups, daisy etc etc. I love to bring a garden and the wild together. I have to say though that beyond the garden gate, where mother nature sprinkles her magic, there is no comparison.........the froth of cow parsley, along with hawthorn, their heady scent lifting my spirit and taking me to places that only mother nature can, is the most wonderful experience.

    A beautiful post Elaine.............lovely images, that show just how beautiful our countryside is at this time of year.

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    1. Hi Cheryl
      I do try to leave as many wildflowers in the garden as I can but try to keep them under control a little as they do tend to take over. Yes, the song of the skylark is a delight and so recognisable but then I love the robin's song and blackbird as well - they all seem to be very vocal at the moment which is no bad thing. Even just walking round the back field there is always something to delight and breathing in all the different fragrances is one of life simple pleasures.

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  15. Lovely to see, I think cow parsley has to be one of my all time summer flowers, have been reconnecting with wild flowers this week and have been surprised how fast things are growing, it's been so cold and windy I'm still thinking it's April and not June next Week !! need to make the most of it now..
    Amanda xx

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    1. Oh I agree Amanda - it is still a little cold here too - but everything wild is coming into in profusion flower and doesn't seem to mind.I can't believe it will soon be June - where does the year go.

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  16. Your search for the wild things produced wonderful results!!! Such wonderful beauty in nature!! xx

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    1. Thank you Amy - it is always a pleasure to go for a walk and see what you can find - there is certainly plenty of choice at the moment.

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  17. It is one of the nicest times of the year to view the wildflowers...although here they are getting harder and harder to find. The sensibilities of the municipality are offended by anything growing on the sides of the roads...and they keep trying to tidy up. This is the verdant green of the country, we don't live in the city...let it grow I want to tell them.

    I do wish we had cow parsley here....it's such a beautiful plant.

    Jen

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    1. I'm surprised that cow parsley isn't universal - I shall order some wind to blow some seeds your way.

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  18. What a wonderful outing, yes, nature does put on a good show in the wild! You have some beautiful wildflowers here and the sound of the skylark must have been the icing on the cake! I loved your description of the pine cones! I always try to leave as many wildflowers that self seed in the garden as I can.....poppies and campion are now beginning to take over! A lovely post, it's always good to be reminded that we're not really in charge!xxx

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    1. Wild flowers are so simple yet pleasing and when they grow on mass like cow parsley - what could be better.

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  19. P.S....I loved the pic of your garden and house at the end....I do hope you smelled that gorgeous vanilla montana perfume!xxx

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    1. I did go out the smell the montana and you are right - a vanilla fragrance - how could I have missed that before especially when I am always sticking my nose into flowers to breathe in their loveliness.

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  20. So beautifully written and you've perfectly captured the essence of the British countryside. I miss cow parsley, something not seen in these parts, but there are other wild flowers and grasses that thrive and beautify our countryside. I'll be including a few pictures of my walk this weekend in my next post. Unlike you, I was unable to identify some of the flora I photographed. Pretty but nameless.

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    1. I look forward to reading your post and seeing what wild flowers you have that are different to ours. I always used to carry a little wild flower book around with me so I could identify things I hadn't seen before - luckily around here there are plenty of open spaces that are left untouched.

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  21. Lovely post to read and look at.

    Mother Nature is number one for providing us with so many plants, flowers, trees and the wonderful array of colours and smells.

    'Home Sweet Home' hope you sat down and enjoyed a cuppa

    All the best Jan

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    1. Thank you Jan.
      My clicking finger was going made on the camera as I kept seeing beautiful things to photograph - so beautiful at this time of year. And yes the kettle went on as soon as we arrived home.

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  22. Good job with all these wildflower photos. You really spent a lot of time on this post. Wonderful to see.

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  23. Thank you for sharing your pursuit of the wonders of the wild. There is so much in our lives around us we take for granted or choose to ignore. The flora and fauna just beyond the garden gate is like you said a gift from Nature she gives freely for all to enjoy.
    We call the little yellow flowers in your first pic Buttercups... legend having that is you place the blossom beneath your chin if it reflects the yellow hue then you like butter. I suspect it would work on everyone on a sunny day but it seems a delightful idea that bridges our lives with the simplicity of youth and the wonders of Nature.
    Have a lovely week.
    Susan x

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    1. We used to do the same thing with buttercups - and yes, apparently I do like butter.

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  24. Dear Elaine- ah I love your view beyond the garden gate. It looks a lot like here in a few weeks. Our Queen Anne's lace has not started blooming yet. Buttercups and multi-flower rose are starting. Your lawn and flowers are so beautiful. Looks like all your hard work has paid off. Thanks for letting me see your wonderful part of the world.

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    1. Dear Debbie
      Thank you. Unfortunately it was a rather overcast day on Sunday so the pictures aren't as bright as I would have liked - but still they are beautiful. Soon the flower border in the front garden will be filled with lovely lavender - I can't wait till it blooms.

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  25. What a gorgeous area you live in. I would love to have so many wildflowers so close by. Mother Nature is the ultimate gardener. The best we can do is copy her. :o)

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    1. It is lovely here - so much open space surrounds us - and plenty of places to spot flowers in the wild - it is good to get out of the garden sometimes and see nature working her wonders.

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  26. I really, really like your new blog header - a lovely rural scene.

    Ms Soup

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    1. Thank you - I am always taking photos of this particular field which looks very different in each season - the horsed are becoming quite used to posing for me!

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  27. I read your profile Elaine and found we have much in common. I haven't been getting your posts though on my dashboard and will have to look into why.

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    1. This happens to me sometimes and also comments come straight through to my blog and not through email - I think it is just Blogger having one of its moments!

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  28. skylarks? Oh what a wonderful privilege!

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    1. Hello Diana
      Thanks for visiting - nice to meet you. I agree listening to the skylarks sing never fails to bring pleasure.

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  29. Elaine, You are surrounded by lush beauty both inside and outside your garden gate. I am dazzled by all the wildflowers you already have blooming. Today, I hiked and found teeny tiny wildflowers close to the ground and my heart soared.

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    1. They are a sight to behold Barb each and every one of them - I expect yours will all come in a rush as the weather warms.

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  30. Goodness, are those wildflowers lovely! So many delicate beauties and all within walking distance of your own colorful garden! I think my favorite today is the sweet campion pinks.

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    1. They seem to be everywhere this year - so pretty and prolific.

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  31. Wild flowers are the best because they grow just as nature intended and where the wind blew their seeds! May is such a beautiful month for flowers.
    So nice to visit you here and thank you for visiting my little corner of the world!

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    1. Hello Sandra - thanks for visiting - and welcome.Oh I do agree they grace the fields and hedgerows with their beauty. Your little corner of the world is beautiful.

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  33. Absolutely beautiful Elaine! Our two worlds look very similar this month, the wilds of New England are in full bloom with many of the same plants.

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    1. Hello Karen
      Welcome and thanks for visiting - this May has been wonderful with such lush greenness and wild flowers in abundance - it is funny to think that all the way around the world you have the same plants blooming.

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  34. I've noticed the same thing recently... the beauty of all our native wildflowers and weeds. They are lovely!

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    1. Hi Kelli
      Sometimes I think we get so used to them that we don't pay them enough attention.

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  35. So much glorious green! May is synonymous with verdant isn't it. I did enjoy this post :)

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    1. Verdant it sure is - I think that is why I love this time of year before summer really starts and everything gets dry and dusty.

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  36. The wild flowers have been stunning this year, have you noticed that they seem to be even better than usual? Sarah x

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    1. Yes they have Sarah - but maybe it's just that we have just taken more notice. Whatever the reason they have put on a wonderful show.

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  37. Like you Elaine, I find myself appreciating wild flowers more and more. What are the pink flowers? Pink Campions perhaps?

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    1. Yes they are Campions but are called Red for some unknown reason.

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  38. Beautiful!
    Have a wonderful week-end!

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  39. there was a skylark in the flower workshop where I was working last week - a rare opportunity to see this beautiful bird close up (we managed to steer it towards the open window and freedom!). Lovely images of wild flora.

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    1. Thank you Ann. How strange that it should fly in - perhaps it was attracted to the smell of flowers - glad you managed to help its escape.

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  40. Elaine, did you Email me about 2 weeks ago? I think it must have been you. Unfortunately I have only just found your message in my 'Junk Mail' folder. I replied this morning, but my Email has just bounced back. I hope whatever it was was solved. Do let me know. Sorry I wasn't able to be of help.

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    1. No - it wasn't me Cro - must have been my doppelganger! Thanks for your concern though.

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    2. Very odd! I received an Email asking for help in France. The address was given as erickett124@hotmail.com but my reply bounced back. It's a mystery.

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    3. Oh I get it now. My email was hacked - I did put out a warning on a blog post not for anyone to respond. Hotmail isn't my email address for future ref.

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