time forgotten ...


Monday
A cool, dry day - no sunshine to speak of. In the afternoon I did a little exploring.  I went on a jaunt to photograph Foxon's Lodge, the abandoned farmhouse, a five minute walk down the road.
 

The farmhouse lies at the bottom of a valley; the track is steep and lined with ancient apple trees that lean to the south - weathered by the prevailing north wind.


I have found a little history of the place.
Alfred Foxon and his wife Harriet moved here in the 1920's and farmed the land around what was then called Peashill Farm.  Alfred was one of thirteen children and Harriet bore him four girls and four boys.  One of the sons, Reg, and his brother Alf, took over the farm after the second World War and ran it until the 1970's when it was sold.  The land is still used but the farmhouse remains empty and has steadily become derelict.


It is always sad to see, that, which was once a home, fall in to disrepair; the window glass all gone and the roof falling in; the farmyard overgrown with weeds.




I look through the windows and let my imagination take flight:  A home that would have rung with the sound of children's laughter; the clank of milk pails from the dairy; hens clucking and scratching around the yard; the heavy horses that pulled the plough and hay cart; mother at the stove cooking rashers of bacon and eggs fresh from the coop for breakfast - a very different sight from what it is today.
Of course, it was probably nothing like that but occasionally I put on my rosy-tinted spectacles and dream.



 Abandoned Buildings
by Dennis Go
 
Abandoned buildings
Made to undress
In the wilderness
See forth a cue.
Another requiem
Passes through their walls
Stripped by dust.
Wandering spirits
Roam and clutter
Around echoing voices
Left by souls
Residing somewhere
In structures
Time forgotten
Years and years ago.
 
Elaine


Comments

  1. Elaine, what a wonderful post. I like your "rosy-tinted spectacles." I find that lane of old apple trees so beautiful and a fitting approach to the farmhouse. It looks like a sturdy house - I wonder why nobody has remodeled it? Here in the states at some places these old farm houses bring a great deal of money. It is fun to imagine the lives that inhabited it.

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    1. Thank you Barb. You can't see the farmhouse from the road so it seems like a secret place - the first thing I noticed when we moved to this village was the row of trees - even though they haven't been touched for decades I still found a few apples growing on them - I wonder if the people who planted them though that they would still be there decades later.

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  2. hope the apple trees have a long and peaceful life ahead of them.
    Rather a beautiful avenue.

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    1. They are old and battered, with bark missing from the trunks and bare branches that have been nibbled at by sheep and cows but they still keep going, albeit not very productively.

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  3. Buy it. Do it up. Move in... be ghosts...

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    1. People have tried to buy it with no luck - now it may be past being able to be done up.

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  4. Elaine, that was an adventure. I am surprised it became derelict that quickly. And, that someone hadn't purchased it and fixed it up. I went into a log cabin once and saw that they had put up a heavy wallpaper in the master bedroom (the only one). There was a kitchen and a big open room with a loft where everyone else slept.

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    1. If only houses could speak, what tales they would have to tell.

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  5. Lovely post Elaine. Especially the thoughts on how life might have been in the house.

    Ms Soup

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    1. Thank you Ms. Soup. I think life on a farm in those days would not have been an easy one, especially with eight children to feed!

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  6. Abandoned homes are fascinating. There used to be loads of them here; no more, most of them have been restored as 'second homes'.

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    1. They certainly bring out the curious in us - I would have liked to climb in through the window, but the rooms didn't look safe and I suppose I was actually trespassing anyway.

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  7. A most enjoyable, and interesting, post and fascinating pictures. It's sad to see such buildings derelict, and like you I would also wonder about the past. Flighty xx

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    1. Thanks Flighty. I certainly could have made up plenty of stories.

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  8. When there is a shortage of homes and when some are without one it's heartbreaking to see these places. I hope someone takes it on. A beautiful post Elaine.

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    1. Thanks Freda. It has been empty for so long and all offers have been refused. Although saying that there is one cruck framed thatched cottage in the village that had been empty for even longer - an old yeomans cottage with just two rooms and a scullery. Even the old range was still in there. Someone bought it and restored it to its former glory and it looks wonderful now - so I suppose there's always a chance.

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  9. I wonder whether anyone eill ever renovate it or is it too far gone?

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    1. I would say too far gone - I certainly wouldn't want to go in for a restoration project that big - it would be a money pit.

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  10. How sad that whoever bought it only wanted to farm the land and not live in the house, or even rent it out. Usually, any house would be used by the farm manager if the owner didn't need it. A lovely post, Elaine, but a very sad story.

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    1. It does seem such a waste as it is in a wonderful position tucked out of the way surrounded by fields - if it was in better condition I would have jumped at the chance to live there.

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  11. I love that tract that leads to the abandoned farmhouse. When I was there walking around the house, I should feel so sad.....such a shame to see derelict houses, even a bit creepy I think.

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    1. It was a bit creepy Janneke - I kept looking over my shoulder as though I was being watched!!!!

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  12. Abandoned buildings, derelict, have a strange aura.
    Today (it is work for me, write about it) I watched Midsomer Murders, and they used a similar building - maybe they could rent it? Otherwise it is a shame that nobody builds it up.

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    1. They are strange with all those blank windows that you half expect someone to peer through watching you. I was more worried at being caught trespassing actually. I had an excuse lined up just in case - but no one interrupted my photo session and I escaped without prosecution :)

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  13. Such a lovely path lined by ancient apple trees. I agree that it's sad to see old houses disintegrate like that when it could probably have been saved and rebuilt before.

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    1. Absolutely Sandra, that is the only thing you can see from the road. Nit is sad that the house is now so derelict but I think it is now too far gone to do anything about. It is in a perfect spot though.

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  14. A lovely post and I love the poem. The building seems to stand as an echo of past lives. There is a sadness about that, but I wonder if it's a home to lots of wildlife. I imagine owls must have moved in.

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    1. It was interesting to try and find out about the people who lived there - luckily a local historian did most of the work for me. I would imagine owls and maybe bats have taken up residence. I didn't venture round the back of the house as I didn't want to get caught napping, maybe another time.

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  15. Ah Elaine! How great to find you again, we are both still here!!! I just loved that ramble with you, and felt I was there.....but as I love these places so much, sorry I wasn't actually there!!

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    1. Hello Catherine
      Long time, no see. We started blogging at roughly the same time but somehow have lost contact from the early days - these things happen :) I love these old tumbledown cottages too - so sad to see them and yet your imagination can make them whole again.

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  16. Gorgeous. Very nice photos♥

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  17. Dear Elaine this home makes me feel nostalgic. It looks like at one time that this was a fine place. The apple tree lined path makes the setting so lovely. I can see my mind would follow yours imaging what had transpired there when the owners cared for the place. Thank you for such beautiful photos and words. Yes friend we have some similar abandoned homes like this in our part of the world. Sometimes when I visit you I feel like we live in the same place. Have a great week. Hugs!

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    1. Dear Debbie
      Thank you for your kind comment. I knew you would feel the same way as me. We must be kindred spirits :)

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  18. I enjoyed seeing your photo's (although it's always slightly sad to see an old derelict building) glad you included some History about Alfred Foxon and his wife Harriet ... always interesting to read.

    As it's now November - may I wish you a good month.
    How many days'til Christmas! Please don't answer, probably not enough! LOL!

    Take care

    All the best Jan

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    1. Glad you enjoyed the post Jan. I wish you a good November too - the year is passing so fast isn't it. And no, you are not allowed to mention Christmas :)

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  19. An interesting read, what a shame it looks like it was once a lovely building. Always sad to see but enjoyed your imaginings.

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