Friday, 7 October 2011

The Last Rose of Summer

In the 70's this rose was all the rage because of its dual colour - it starts off lemon and gradually turns pink then dark crimson as it gets older.  But I'm blowed if I can remember its name.  It is still pushing out buds, but nearly all the leaves have dropped off, and it gets blackspot.  I don't get on very well with roses in my garden, the soil is too light I think - but I haven't the heart to dig it out as it keeps flowering against the odds.
I have no idea what this plant is either, I use it in my container planting, where it flowers all summer.  I have potted it up in the hope that it will overwinter in the greenhouse.  The flowers open and close with the sun and it trails over the edge of the container looking really pretty (purple flowers are a favourite).  Could be some variety of Aubretia maybe - whatever it is, I hope it survives, to be replanted next year.

Whilst I was working in the garden yesterday this tree kept appearing in the corner of my eye - it is a few gardens away and dominates the skyline - a huge Sycamore where thousands of Starlings have roosted some years when huge flocks  performed their acrobatic dances in the back field.  I haven't seen that happen for a number of years now but the tree stands waiting for them to come back and offer them shelter.

Oi - hands off me nuts

9 comments:

  1. Hi, Pretty rose, your description immediately made me wonder if it is the Peace rose? Somehow that rose sticks in my childhood memories...
    The starlings are beginning to swoop around us, from tree to tree, I'm hoping to catch some better pictures of their murmurations this year.
    Sara

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  2. That is a gorgeous rose, I must look up in my dad's massive rose encyclopedia at weekend.

    College is going ok thanks, a little slow for me and i'm finishing the work too quickly at the moment. Suppose that's better than being behind.

    Sam x

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  3. Your rose - I don't know what it is called and only became aware of it three or four years ago. At first, I was amazed and impressed by the way it changed colour and thought I would look for one myself. Then I went off it when I realised there was a version in every third garden. Grass is clever. However much there is of it, we still like it. Very odd.

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  4. Lovely post and photos. Flighty xx

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  5. Hillwards - I know it's definitely not the Peace rose - very similar though.

    Homebird - let me know if you find out what it is.

    Esther your're right it used to be very popular.

    Thanks Flighty - I know you are a rose lover

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  6. Hillwards - I know it's definitely not the Peace rose - very similar though.

    Homebird - let me know if you find out what it is.

    Esther your're right it used to be very popular.

    Thanks Flighty - I know you are a rose lover

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  7. Hi Elaine, I have more than a few plants that I can't identify! It makes it harder to write about in a post, but otherwise I find it really doesn't matter if I know the name to appreciate their beauty. Your unidentified rose is pretty. I have a number of similar plants that limp along. I don't have the heart to dig them out either.

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  8. I remember that rose from my childhood too, but wouldn't have clue what it was called but I've got quite a lot of reference books so I'll have a look to see if I can find it.

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  9. I've had a look through my books and the only rose that seems to fit the description is a variety called Sea Pearl. I have an old copy of a Dr Hessayon book on roses and it's in there, unfortunately the quality of the photographs is not very good. It says 'a new variety with delicate and unique colouring, pearly pink suffused with peach and yellow shadings'. I don't know if this name rings any bells?

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